Ornithogalum

Ornithogalum

Ornithogalum is a genus of plants that belongs to the family Hyacinthaceae. This genus has very many species but is practically unknown in cultivation except for the yellow and orange species of group A. The group C in particular has a number of striking species, small compact plants with rather large flowers, excellent for pot cultivation. The flowers of all have a silky texture that is very attractive.

From the cultivation point there are three distinct groups A) The autumn-winter-spring growers from S. W. South Africa. They are mostly spring bloomers. They demand intense sunlight and rather frost free conditions. Dry summer dormant. Tender B) The spring-summer-autumn growers from hot subtropical to tropical Africa, mostly late spring/summer bloomers. Most demand intense sunlight and frost free to hot conditions. Dry winter dormant. Tender C) The autumn-winter-spring growers from the countries around the Mediterranean Sea, mostly spring bloomers. They demand sunlight and cool growing conditions and are hardy to very hardy. Information furnished by Alberto Castillo in his Introductionto the Ornithogalum topic of the week discussion on the pbs list in December 2002.

J. Manning, P. Goldblatt & M.F. Fay in a "A revised generic synopsis of Hyacinthaceae in sub-Saharan Africa, including new combinations and the new tribe Pseudoprospereae", Edinburgh Journal of Botany 60(3): 533-568 (2004) the authors propose sinking Albuca, Dipcadi, Galtonia, Neopatersonia, and Pseudogaltoniainto Ornithogalum. Further work by researchers at SANBI, the Missouri Botanical Garden and Kew has not supported all of these changes and Albuca, Dipcadi, and Pseudogaltoniahave been reinstated.

In a "A molecular phylogeny and a revised classification of Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) based on an analysis of four plastid DNA regions" written by John C. Manning, Félix Forest, Dion S. Devey, Michael F. Fay & Peter Goldblatt in TAXON 58 (1), February 2009: 1-107, this subject is again addressed. Three clades are identified. Clade A is recognized as the genus Albuca. Clade B comprises the genera Dipcadiand Pseudogaltonia. Clade C is the genus Ornithogalum and includes Galtoniaand Neopatersonia. Clade A and Clade C are differentiated as follows: Clade A (Albuca) has a well-defined green or brownish median longitudinal band on the outer surface of each tepal and a concentration of 3-5 veins along the midline. Clade C (Ornithogalum) has uniformly colored tepals with at the most a narrow or indistinct darker band without the veins. This means that species that were previously considered to belong in Ornithogalum are now included in Albuca. We will be conforming to these changes, but keeping the synonyms as plants will still be found in books and in the trade under their previous names.

Fresh seeds of this genus are often very easy to germinate. South African species often have a short viability time of about 6 months to a year. Seeds of some species such as O. dubium are tiny and dust-like. In such cases, they should be sown in a well-drained mix of 1:1 organic:inorganic mix with the top being a fine mix so that the tiny seedlings will not be shaded out by mix particles. Otherwise, sow regular sized seeds normally in the same mix as above.

Plantationinstruction

outdoor Beds

1.  Find a location where the soil drains well.  If there are still water puddles 5-6 hours after a hard rain, scout out another site.  Or amend the soil with the addition of organic material to raise the level 2 - 3 inches to improve the drainage.  Peat moss, compost, ground bark or decomposed manure all work well and are widely available.

 2. Site your ornithogalum where they will get full day sun. 

 3. Dig holes and plant the ornithogalum bulbs 3" deep and 6" apart.  The bulbs look like small onions.  Plant them with the pointed ends facing up.

 4.  After planting, water ornithogalum well, thoroughly soaking the area.  Roots and sprouts will form in the autumn.  Winter will bring taller growth and flowers will develop in the spring. 

 5.  When in bloom, feel free to cut ornithogalum flowers for bouquets.  This will not hurt the plants.

 6.  After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off.  The leaves will gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year's show.  Water as needed.

 7.  Later in the summer the leaves will yellow and die back as the plant slips into dormancy.  Foliage may be removed at this point.  Your ornithogalum will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.

  

Pots, Tubs & Urns

1.  Fill your containers with good quality, well-drained soil.  Almost any commercially available potting medium will work fine.  Make sure there are adequate drainage holes; ornithogalum must never sit in waterlogged soil or they will rot.

 2.  Site containers where they will receive full day sun. 

 3.  Plant your ornithogalum 3” deep and 5” apart for the most brilliant display.  The bulbs look like small onions.  Plant them with the pointed ends facing up.

 4.  After planting, water ornithogalum well, thoroughly soaking the area.  Roots and sprouts will form in the autumn.  Winter will bring taller growth and flowers will develop in the spring. 

 5.  After blooming has finished for the season leave the foliage in place; don't cut it off.  The leaves will gather sunlight and provide nourishment for next year's show.  Water as needed. 

 6.  Later in the summer the leaves will yellow and die back as the plant slips into dormancy.  Foliage may be removed at this point.  Your ornithogalum will rest for a few months before beginning the next growing cycle.

 Quantity tips:

            For 12-15” pots - plant 15

            For 10” pots - plant 10-12

            For 8” pots - plant 7   


Free Ornithogalum


Simply you have to apply for Free Ornithogalum and will get your Free Ornithogalum at your door step with no any cost. Click Here, if you are Interested to get Free Ornithogalum.